Ramekon O’Arwisters & Markus Linnenbrink @ PULSE Miami Beach 2017

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #5 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 20.5 x 16 x 10 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #5 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 20.5 x 16 x 10 inches

Markus LinnenbrinkZEIGEFINGERZAUBERWORT / 2017/ epoxy resin / 14 x 14 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #2 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 24 x 10 x 11 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #2 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 24 x 10 x 11 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #8 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic /  16.25 x 12.5 x 12 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #8 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic /  16.25 x 12.5 x 12 inches

MARKUS LINNENBRINK / LOSTSOMEBODYMOVINGBACKWARDS 2017 / epoxy resin on wood panel / 48 x 96 inches  (123.84 cm x 247.68 cm)

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #3 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 18.5 x 17 x 15 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #3 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 18.5 x 17 x 15 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #1 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 25.5 x 10.5 x 9 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #1 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 25.5 x 10.5 x 9 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #12 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 13 x 16 x 13 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #12 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 13 x 16 x 13 inches

MARKUS LINNENBRINKWHATSHOULDN’TIBETODAY 2017 / epoxy resin on wood panel / 18 x 96 inches  (46.44 cm x 247.68 cm)

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #6 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 17.5 x 11 x 9.5 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #6 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 17.5 x 11 x 9.5 inches

MARKUS LINNENBRINKBLOODONME / 2017 / epoxy resin on wood panel / 24 x 36 inches  (61.92 cm x 92.88 cm)

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #11 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 9.5 x 8 x 14 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #11 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 9.5 x 8 x 14 inches

MARKUS LINNENBRINK ISOMETIMESDOTHEDISHES / 2017 / epoxy resin on wood panel / 48 x 48 inches  (123.84 cm x 123.84 cm)

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #10 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 8.5 x 5.5 x 5.5 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #10 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 8.5 x 5.5 x 5.5 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #4 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 21 x 10.5 x 11.5 inches

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Mending #4 / 2017 / fabric, ceramic / 21 x 10.5 x 11.5 inches

Press Release

PULSE Miami Beach 2017 – Booth S-206
Ramekon O’Arwisters: Sculpture
Markus Linnenbrink: Paintings
Exhibition Dates: Thursday, December 7 – Sunday, December 10, 2017
Location: Indian Beach Park, 4601 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
Links to: VIP Pass & Day Pass

 

Patricia Sweetow Gallery is honored to debut the crocheted fabric sculptures of Ramekon O’Arwisters and the resin paintings of Markus Linnenbrink at PULSE MIAMI 2017, Thursday, December 7 – Sunday, December 10, 2017. Integral to each artist’s practice is their attention to the working process inherent in their materials and how that investigation is driven by an intuitive consideration of color, form and by consequence, intention.

The series of Ramekon O’Arwisters unique crocheted/ceramic sculptures are aptly titled, Mending. The free-form abstractions entangle shards of broken ceramic vessels within coils of crocheted fabric. Employing ordinary household, or decorative pottery that’s broken and discarded, O’Arwisters combines traditional crafts into a dimensional woven tapestry, stripping both cloth and ceramic of their intended function.

Ramekon grew up in North Carolina with a grandmother who included him in the folk tradition of making quilts. “When I was growing up in North Carolina, I helped my paternal grandmother, Celia Jones Taylor (1896–1982) make quilts. Quilt-making with her is one of my fondest childhood memories. With her, I was embraced, important, and special. I was a little black boy hiding my queer self from my family during the harsh reality of the Jim Crow South during the 1960s and before the turbulent years of the Civil Rights Movement that spread throughout the country.”

A San Francisco-based social practice artist, Ramekon O’Arwisters is the founder of Crochet Jam, a community arts project infused with folk-art traditions that foster a creative culture in cooperative relationships. The crocheted rag event allows a diverse audience to create together, refocusing energy toward shared goals.

Born in Kernersville, North Carolina, O’Arwisters earned a M.Div. from Duke University Divinity School in 1986. He was an artist-in-residence at the de Young Museum, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, and the Vermont Studio Center. Grants and Awards include Artadia: The Fund for Art and Dialogue, NY, the San Francisco Foundation and the San Francisco Arts Commission Cultural Equity Program. He also received the 2014 Eureka Fellow, awarded by the Fleishhacker Foundation, San Francisco. His work has been featured in the LA Times, San Francisco Chronicle, 7×7 Magazine, Artnet, and the San Francisco Examiner.

Ramekon O’Arwisters one-person exhibition at PSG opens January 6th – February 10th, 2018. Concurrent with his exhibition he’ll be featured with RECOLOGY Artist Residency at the January 2018 UNTITLED Art Fair in San Francisco.

Markus Linnenbrink, pours and pools resin with cumulative layers of opaque and translucent pigments building the dramatic physicality of his objects. With inventive mastery Markus Linnenbrink’s paintings are described as both performative and extreme. For three decades Linnenbrink’s inventive methodology drives with intuitive intentionality, not with an eye to distract, but with the alchemists quest for transformation. There’s no question viewing a Linnenbrink painting is the stuff of ponderous pleasure, but it also transports beyond the constraints of what ‘is’ to what ‘isn’t’. Pagel comments, “After a few generations of art made by artists who seem to believe that the pursuit of knowledge and that of pleasure follow paths that go in opposite directions, it’s refreshing to come across Linnenbrink’s works, which, in their multi-directional ambidexterity, both insist and demonstrate that physical pleasure and intellectual stimulation work in concert, enhancing and amplifying each other’s best features while fueling the fires of a viewer’s experiences.”

Markus Linnenbrink garnered attention in the U.S. and Europe with wall paintings at the UCLA Hammer Museum, the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, the Kunstmuseum in Bonn, and Haus Esters, Krefeld. Recent significant commissions are The Rockefeller Center, NY with a 7 by 90 foot painting installed in their public concourse lobby; and Morrison Foerster, NY installation of 8 wall paintings, 9 by 42 feet, on each of their eight floors. Over 50 works are in public collections which include the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; UCLA Hammer Museum; The Hague Ministry of Culture, the Netherlands; Museum Neue Galerie, Kassel; Museum Katharinenhof, Kranenburg; Kunsthalle Recklinghausen; Herzliya Museum of Art, Israel, and Clemens- Sels- Museum, Neuss and 75 Rockefeller Center, NY.

Ramekon O’Arwisters / Heike Kati Barath

RAMEKON O’ARWISTERS / Mending 5 / PULSE Miami 2017  / -Thursday, December 7 –
Sunday, December 10, 2017

Press Release

Exhibition Dates: January 6 – February 10, 2018
Ramekon O’Arwisters: Fiber Sculpture
Heike Kati Barath: paintings
Reception: Saturday, January 6th,  3 – 6 pm

Events: We’ve scheduled two Crochet Jam’s!  –  Saturday, January 20th and a Closing Reception Crochet Jam Saturday, February 10th – please join us for both! Times TBA

 

Patricia Sweetow Gallery is honored to debut the crocheted fabric sculptures of Ramekon O’Arwisters and the paintings of Heiki Kati Barath.  The exhibition opens Saturday, January 6th through February 10th, 2018. Reception for the artists is Saturday, January 6th from 3 – 6pm.  Concurrent with his exhibition he’ll be featured with RECOLOGY Artist Residency at the January 2018 UNTITLED Art Fair in San Francisco.

The series of Ramekon O’Arwisters unique crocheted/ceramic sculptures are aptly titled, Mending. The free-form abstractions entangle shards of broken ceramic vessels within coils of crocheted fabric. Employing ordinary household, or decorative pottery that’s broken and discarded, O’Arwisters combines traditional crafts into a dimensional woven tapestry, stripping both cloth and ceramic of their intended function.

Ramekon grew up in North Carolina with a grandmother who included him in the folk tradition of making quilts. “When I was growing up in North Carolina, I helped my paternal grandmother, Celia Jones Taylor (1896–1982) make quilts. Quilt-making with her is one of my fondest childhood memories. With her, I was embraced, important, and special. I was a little black boy hiding my queer self from my family during the harsh reality of the Jim Crow South during the 1960s and before the turbulent years of the Civil Rights Movement that spread throughout the country.”

A San Francisco-based social practice artist, Ramekon O’Arwisters is the founder of Crochet Jam, a community arts project infused with folk-art traditions that foster a creative culture in cooperative relationships. The crocheted rag event allows a diverse audience to create together, refocusing energy toward shared goals.

Born in Kernersville, North Carolina, O’Arwisters earned a M.Div. from Duke University Divinity School in 1986. He was an artist-in-residence at the de Young Museum; the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, and the Vermont Studio Center. Grants and Awards include Artadia: The Fund for Art and Dialogue, NY, the San Francisco Foundation and the San Francisco Arts Commission Cultural Equity Program. He also received the 2014 Eureka Fellow, awarded by the Fleishhacker Foundation, San Francisco. His work has been featured in the LA Times, San Francisco Chronicle, 7×7 Magazine, Artnet, and the San Francisco Examiner.

Concurrent with his exhibition he’ll be featured with RECOLOGY Artist Residency at the January 2018 UNTITLED Art Fair in San Francisco.

The paintings of German artist Heike Kati Barath, b. 1966 can be described as imaginative, intuitive, naïve, pure and innocent, with overtones of anxiety and predatory sexual aggression. Her child-like figures stare out at the viewer with defiant intensity and vulnerability. 

 Kati Barath’s enormous portraits of prepubescent girls are saturated with colour. With silicon paint she animates the figures, adding features that suggest a  unkempt jaunticed view of life.  While the content of her work is sexually and psychologically provocative and disturbing, the formal qualities are enticing. 

Heike Kati Barath is a professor at the University of the Arts Bremen. She lives and works in Berlin. She is represented by Mark Mueller in Zurich and Cokkei Snoei in Rotterdam. Her exhibition record includes numerous solo exhibits throughout Europe, including The Institute for Modern Art, Nürnberg, Museum Baden, Solingen and many others. She’s included in international public and private collections.

 

 

Joachim Bandau / Toshiaki Noda

Joachim Bandau / P1130453 / 2013 / watercolor on paper / 30 x 22 inches  (77.4 cm x 56.76 cm)

Joachim Bandau / P1130468 / 2013 / watercolor on paper / 30 x 22 inches  (77.4 cm x 56.76 cm)

Joachim Bandau / P1130455/ 2013 / watercolor on paper / 30 x 22 inches  (77.4 cm x 56.76 cm)

Toshiaki Noda / Upcoming February 17th / Installation view Tomio Koyama Gallery

Toshiaki Noda / Upcoming February 17th / Installation view Tomio Koyama Gallery

Toshiaki Noda / Upcoming February 17th / Installation view Tomio Koyama Gallery

Press Release

Exhibition Dates: February 17 – March 31, 2018
Joachim Bandau: paintings
Toshiaki Noda: ceramic sculpture
Reception: Saturday, February 17,  3 – 6 pm

PSG looks forward to the exhibitions of  Joachim Bandau with black watercolors and the ceramic sculpture of Toshiaki Noda. The reception for the artists is Saturday, February 17, 3 – 6pm.

Joachim Bandau (b.1936) belongs to a protean group of German artists, along with Gerhard Richter, Joseph Beuys, and Imi Knoebel, who came out of the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in 1961. It’s difficult to capture Bandau’s history in a few brief paragraphs, however there were key periods worth commenting upon. Beginning in the late 70ʼs, Bandau created steel and lead sculpture which were anchored to the ground by sheer weight, then eventually pushed underground. Prior to this, works were mobile, as in Documenta 7 in 1977, where polychrome sculptures were animated by mechanics made by Mercedes Benz. As with Carl Andreʼs development of the floor sculpture, and Bruce Naumanʼs concrete casting of the empty space under his chair, this new art form “Bodenskulptur”, Floor Sculpture, gave Bandau an independent and important context.

Following his inclusion in Documenta 6, 1977, came “Bunkers”, lead covers over wooden cores, then “Särge” (coffins), and “Mumienkästen” (boxes for mummies), which continued his referent to the human condition and form, along with Germany’s complex post-WWII re-invention. Moving into the 80ʼs, Bandau synthesized his political and social commentaries in linear, geometric shapes, one such, a series of lead spiked sculptures titled, Field of Tears that today are in the Ludwig Museum collections of Cologne and Aachen. Bandau continued to explore and define sculpture in many important exhibitions including, “Inside. Outside. An Aspect of Contemporary Sculpture” at the MUHKA in Antwerp in 1987.

In 1983, Bandau began making large format watercolors that arose from his densely hatched sculptorʼs drawings. Measuring several inches, or feet, the watercolors resonate the lines of his sculpture, a slow precise brushstroke of various widths and density, layered on heavy deckled paper, using Japanese brushes. The veil of pigments form a slow volume outlined by fine pigments. Alternating a process of painting, then drying, the new works form a rhythmic syntax, moving from light to dark, and edge to edge. The dynamic brushwork may have a vortex within the format of the paper, then layer upon layer begin it’s ascent, or descent off the edge.

Bandau has had an uninterrupted schedule of major museum and gallery exhibitions dating back fifty years. Joachim Bandau lives and works in Germany

PSG is pleased to welcome Toshiaki Noda from New York in his first exhibition at the gallery. Noda was born in 1982 in Arita, Saga Prefecture, Japan, a region noted for its remarkable porcelain ceramics dating back to the 1600’s. Noda’s parents were dealers in this treasured craft, where Toshiaki grew up in an incomparable aesthetic culture, influencing his studio practice today.

Toshiaki Noda left Japan for California State University, Long Beach where he received a BFA in printmaking in 2008. His printmaking education combined with his aesthetic and technical training in Japan leant a unique vision to his ceramic practice. Unlike the smooth, consistent surface of the treasured Imari wares, Toshiaki uses the plasticity of clay to push boundaries of form, and the alchemy of glaze to explore texture. His vessels exude temporal exigence, with layers of crust, tears, cracks, gloss and color. With spontaneity and curiosity as his guide, Toshiaki’s small sculptural planes beg our examination.

In this exhibition we have combined several series of ceramics – larger vessels from 2012/13, along with recent small experimental forms first exhibited in New York and Milan. The series have at their core a textural and structural adulteration suggesting nature’s inevitable degradation.

Recent exhibitions include Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo as well as exhibitions in Milan and New York.

 

 

 

Exhibition Dates: April 7 – May 12, 2018
Gail Wight: drawings, installation
Reception: Saturday, April 4th, 3 – 6 pm

 

Exhibition Dates: May 19 – June 30, 2018
Jiha Moon: paintings, ceramic sculpture
Reception: Saturday, May 19th, 3 – 6 pm